2017 Chicago Black Sox Instructions

2017 Instructions

 

2017 Instructions

Welcome to Black Sox Baseball. This is not quite the same type of team we have fielded in recent years. Overall the pitching is improved and we play pretty good defense. We do not carry the same level of baseball “bashers” as in the past couple of Title runs but we still have plenty of hitting and power to make you work your pitching staff a bit.

2017 Active Roster

Hitters


Bandy, Jett

Catcher

 

Arrieta, Jake

#1 Starter

Rupp, Cameron

Catcher

 

Hellickson, Jeremy

#2 Starter

Bour, Justin

First Base

 

Colon, Bartolo

#3 Starter

Myers, Wil

First Base / Outfield

 

Chatwood, Tyler

#4 Starter

Walker, Neil

Second Base

 

Montgomery, Mike

#5 Starter / Reliever

Flores, Wilmer

Infield

 

 

 

Rivera, T.J.

Infield

 

Neris, Hector

Closer

Bryant, Kris

Third Base / Outfield

 

Belisle, Matt

Set-up

Crawford, Brendon

Shortstop

 

Kontos, George

Set-up

Turner, Trea

Outfield / 2B and SS

 

Cahill, Trevor

Reliever

Herrera, Odubel

Outfield

 

Robles, Hansel

Reliever

Bruce, Jay

Outfield

 

Barrett, Jake

Reliever

Piscotty, Stephen

Outfield

 

 

 

Hamilton, Billy

Centerfield

 

 

 

Minors


Gonzalez, Gio

 

 

Hoover, J.J.

 

Hoffman, Jeff

 

 

Nelson, Jimmy

 

Davis, Spector

 

 

Rosenthal, Trevor

 

Overview - Hitting and Offense

This team is about putting pressure on the pitcher and the opposition defense. We do not sit back and look for the 3-run homer. That team apparently moved relocated to Hawaii.

Chicago has solid hitting, good on-base, and some power that is spread across the lineups. These are totally different teams when facing a Lefty starter or a Righty starter. Versus the Righty the offense will need to push the running game by stealing and taking the extra base if we are to be successful. That does not mean changing the percentages, they will already be there for you. You can steal in front of anyone that is batting – there is enough balance in the line-up where I am not concerned about an intentional walk. The other fundamentals – well not so much – but they can get on base and then run like crazy.

Facing the Lefty starter it is a bit more cautious on the bases. Chicago has serious beef against the lefty (over 42 HR chances and 46 diamond chances) to go along with a bunch of hits and on-base. Less aggressive stealing and running here and let them swing away. I do not expect to see too many lefties thereof.

There are few options for “small ball” with this team. On rare occasions Hamilton or Herrera can squeeze or H&R, but is really about the hitting, on-base, and speed on the base paths. They are not clutch in the top half of the line-ups – run more aggressively with two outs when those guys are on deck, and less so for the plus clutch hitters in the bottom part of the lineup.

The team can score in bunches – be patient with the offense, it usually comes around if starting slowly.

Starting Line-ups


Lineup 1, vs. L

Lineup 2, vs. L

Lineup 3, vs. R

Lineup 4, vs. R

Lineup 5, vs. R

8

Herrera

8

Herrera

8

Hamilton (a)

8

Hamilton

7

Herrera

7

Bryant

7

Bryant

7

Herrera

7

Herrera

8

Turner

5

Flores

5

Flores

9

Turner

5

Bryant

5

Bryant

4

Walker

4

Walker

5

Bryant

3

Bour

4

Walker

9

Piscotty

9

Piscotty

4

Walker

4

Walker

9

Piscotty

2

Rupp

6

Crawford

3

Myers / Bour (b)

9

Bruce

3

Myers

3

Myers

2

Rupp

6

Crawford

6

Crawford

6

Crawford

6

Crawford

3

Myers

2

Rupp

2

Rupp

2

Bandy

 

All Left-handed pitchers (not listed in Lineup 2)

 

 

Only (bat left) against:
Happ, Paxton, Rusin, Matz and Wood.

 

Standard lineup v RHP
(not listed in Lineup 4 of 5)

[See below Lineup Note (b)]

 

Second RHP lineup against:
Hammel, Eickoff, Cole, Nova, Desclafani, Syndergaard, Maeda, Smardzija, Teheran, Bradley, Wainwright, Phelps, Eovaldi, and Scherzer.

 

Third RHP lineup against:
Karns, Leake, Guerra, Stripling, Degrom, Strasburg, Nola, Wacha, and Walker.

Additional Notes on Lineups

 

Guidelines on Positions

 

WHEN YOUR LEFTY STARTER EXITS THE GAME
Lineups 1 & 2: Typically no changes early. If you have zero or one lefty reliever Flores immediately comes out. Options are Hamilton or Bruce (Bryant to 3B), or Rivera (3B) or Turner (LF) to bat right. If 2 lefties he stays in as does everyone else until the 7th. In the 7th, tied or leading, Bryant to 3B and either Turner to CF (one-run game) or Hamilton if a lead of 2 or more. If trailing we start looking at best match-ups. Consider pinch-hitting for Rupp, Myers if a bad match-up as well (Rivera or Bour to 1B). When replacing, be aware of the possible late inning closer and who we might need to pinch-hit in the 9th.

WHEN YOUR RIGHTY STARTER EXITS THE GAME
Lineup 3-5: Bour immediately comes out replaced by Myers or Rivera. If Bruce is starting he can stay in, but he should not face a lefty reliever. Everyone else stays put through the 5th inning. The rest of the instruction here is purely against a lefty reliever in the 7th or later. If tied or leading Hamilton can stay in the game in the 7th but after that he stays in only if we have a lead. If no one is on base, but if runners on or we are trailing he does not face a lefty reliever. Everyone else stays in through 6 after which you may want to use “COMPARE” for best options if trailing, notwithstanding those that “never come out”.

 

Defense Matrix – Best Defense in Bold


C

1B

2B

SS

3B

LF

CF

RF

Rupp

Myers

Walker

Crawford

Bryant

Herrera

Hamilton

Piscotty

Bandy

Rivera

Rivera

Turner

Flores

Bryant

Herrera

Bruce

 

Flores

Flores

Flores

Rivera

Turner

Turner

Myers

 

Bryant

Turner

 

 

Bruce

Piscotty

Turner

MISCELLANEOUS

Pitcher hitting / Pinch hitting / Pinch running

Pitching Rotation

 

YOUR GAMES (to play at your park)

 

 

My Games (played in The Black Diamond)

 

Opp.

Game #1

Game #2

Game #3

 

 

Game #1

Game #2

Game #3

 

BAG

Arrieta

Hellickson

Chatwood

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Chatwood

 

LVB

Arrieta

Colon

Montgomery

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Montgomery

 

SBM

Arrieta

Colon

Montgomery

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Montgomery

 

SCT

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

 

Hellickson

Arrieta

Chatwood

 

AZL

Arrieta

Hellickson

Montgomery

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Montgomery

 

AUG

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

 

Hellickson

Arrieta

Chatwood

 

LAN

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

 

Hellickson

Arrieta

Chatwood

 

HAW

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Chatwood

 

CHI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PBC

Arrieta

Colon

Montgomery

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Montgomery

 

STL

Arrieta

Hellickson

Montgomery

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Montgomery

 

VBS

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

 

Hellickson

Colon

Chatwood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Divisional Games – AWAY GAMES

 

Divisional Games – Home Games

Opp.

Game #1

Game #2

Game #3

Game #4

 

Game #1

Game #2

Game #3

Game #4

PBC

Hellickson

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

Hellickson

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

STL

Hellickson

Arrieta

Montgomery

Chatwood

 

Hellickson

Arrieta

Montgomery

Chatwood

VBS

Hellickson

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

 

Hellickson

Arrieta

Colon

Chatwood

# Starts:  Arrieta (20); Colon (20); Hellickson (20); Chatwood (18); Montgomery (12)

Managing the Starters

 

The pitching game has changed in baseball and Strat-O reflects that. So should the Sox’ guideline for the starting pitcher. “Long and Hard” (Arrieta) is getting him through 7; Colon and Hellickson through 6; Chatwood and Montgomery through 5. The key with the starters is that they can go as long as the game remains within a run or two through 5 innings, and certainly with leads of 3 runs or more. Innings 6 and 7 are the critical point that I do not want to let the game get away. All starters leave the game once they are “tired”.

Starting Pitcher Overview


Jake Arrieta
197 IP
(patience)

He is the “long and hard” guy, and as a “#8” hitter you do not need to pinch-hit for him. Any decisions about keeping him in will strictly be on pitching performance. I am looking for him to go deep in games, as he is the first starter for all the road 3-game series. Less patience when we get into the 7th especially against heavy lefty lineups.

Bartolo Colon
192 IP
(some patience)

A solid year and a solid card for Colon. Tougher on lefties but occasionally leaves one up and over the plate against them. I have tried to spot his road starts where that will not hurt us as much, but once we hit the 6th he becomes a batter-by-batter if still in the game. Should not face big lefty with runners on in the 6th and a real quick hook once we hit the 7th.

Jeremy Hellickson
189 IP
(some patience)

A solid year and a solid card for Hellickson. His instruction is similar to Colon in that we can be patient with him early but once we hit the 6th he also becomes batter-by-batter. Can go deeper in the game if cruising with a big lead but want a quick hook once we hit the 7th with small leads, tied or trailing.

Tyler Chatwood
158 IP
(little patience)

He always is last in the rotation for every series. It is a balanced card that holds runners on, lots of DP’s and little in HR’s – still, I am nervous about him. So depending upon the first games in the series, and with a healthy pen the relievers are going to be the better option. Big leads he can go longer, but If gets us through 5 and into the 6th, that would be a good outing.

Mike Montgomery
100 IP
(little patience)

A solid lefty starter (yes, an oxymoron in this League) that keeps the ball in the park and does not give up much against either side of the plate. He has 100 innings and 12 starts, and is only used “situationally” in relief when not starting. 6-7 innings per start.

Specific innings limitations:

Montgomery – 7 innings is the absolute max, and would prefer 6 so we have “situational” innings for him in relief. The rest have plenty of innings for their scheduled work.

Managing the Bullpen

There is a lot of strength in this staff from the bullpen. If Arrieta can go deep in his start (as he is #1 in all 3-game, and #2 in the 4-game sets) you should have plenty of arms and innings to throw out there the rest of the series. So with that you can start looking towards the pen as early as the 5th in close games – just do not let it get away in innings 5-7 by being too patient with the starter.

Neris’ 80 innings as a closer lets us work the pen in earlier in the game so a mix and match and/or turn you around strategy is a good option. You do not need to be patient with a reliever either – if in doubt go to the next one up. Use the depth and go to 3, 4, even 5 relievers in a game if we have to. Go heavy to the bullpen.

 

Relief Pitcher Overview

Closer

Hector Neris (80 IP) is the “closer”. He comes in at any time in the 8th or 9th for the save. A 2-inning save is just fine. No earlier than starting the 8th – we have other cards to handle that.

Set-up and Middle Relief

 

 

 

 

 

George Kontos (53 IP) is preferably a late inning set-up but really can be used at any point in the game. Tough on righties and not the best candidate against heavy lefty lineups, however keeps the ball in the park against both sides. He can go an inning “plus” per outing depending on match-ups. An alternate closer if Neris is unavailable.

Matt Belisle (46 IP) is the counter to Kontos. He is tough on the lefty hitter, but not the guy you want against a bunch of righties. He also keeps the ball in the park for both sides. Certainly no more than an inning “plus” per outing and no more than 2 innings per 3-game series as a guideline – but an extra batter does not matter. Moral of the story for both is they can face their “nemesis side” (L or R) – but try not to face three in a row.

Trevor Cahill (66 IP) provides the versatility in the pen. Tougher on lefties but can hold his own against righties but not against an “exclusively right-handed” line-up. He pitches anywhere in the game innings 5 -8 and is probably one of the “alternate closers” for Neris, and alternate set-up for the other two. Usually used for more than just a batter – he is a “use and abuse” guy out of the pen.

Mike Montgomery (100 IP but only 20+ in relief) is a situational lefty (CHECK THE STARTER SCHEDULE IN THE SERIES) to face a key lefty or two to get out of an inning or start an inning in a short stint. Should not pitch more than an inning at a time and generally in innings 6-8.

Long or Early Relief (mop-up) or later “Quick Stop” Options

Jake Barrett (59 IP) against the RHH is preferred against the predominant right-handed line-up. Slightly wild against the lefty hitter so should not go to a heavier lefty line-up unless we are mopping up a bad loss. Next 2 out of 3 or 3 out of 5 hitters should be righty when you bring him in. A good election if an early exit by Chatwood or Montgomery. Can also be used as a situational righty against the tough righty that does not get pinch-hit for in later innings.

Hansel Robles (78 IP) is the option against the predominant lefty line-up. A good option for early exits by the righty starter (Arrieta, Hellickson, Chatwood) and/or against lefty-laden line-ups. Also used as the long-man mop-up when we are getting blown out – which I hope does not happen too often!!!

 

 

”If you come to play ball in The Black Diamond, you better bring your sticks”


2016 Awards:

2016 PCL Champion:

Santa Barbara Mooners

 

 

2016 MVP Voting:

MVP: B. Harper, LVB

Cy Young: J. Arriera, STL

2016 ALL STARS:

C: B. Posey, PBC

1b: J. Votto, AZL

2b: D. Gordon, STL

SS: Tie: B. Crawford, PBC; J. Peralta, AGN

3b: J. Kang, HAW

OF: B. Harper, LVB

OF: M. Trout, SCT

OF: R. Grichuk, SCT

Manager: Eric

GM: Mike

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